Old Bastard Trick Tip #5: 180 Shove-It

In keeping with the simple movement/flow footwork kind of thing we’re looking at here, this week’s tip is for 180 shove-its. Again, you can learn these on a normal board. I’d love it if you’d go to Moonshine skateboard or Mode Skateboards (see the side-bar) and buy a freestyle board, but don’t let that stop you from working on this stuff.

Like any other trick, it’s easier to do a shitty shove-it. I did a bunch when I was filming the first version for this tip. Bad landings. Simple trick, but bad landings. Weird. I’ve been doing these tricks for 40 years, but still the bad landings plague me on the forward 180 shove-it. That’s OK. Just means I can still get better! So once you start landing these, start working on making good landings (I kept landing the forward shove-it with my back heel on the board, toes hanging way off, and it looked like crap).

Old Bastard Freestyle Trick Tip 5: the 180 Shove-It from Bob Loftin on Vimeo.

Old Bastard Trick Tip #4: End-Overs

First, for a really comprehensive guide to learning this trick, I recommend you go to Tony Gales End-Overs tip on FreestyleTrickTips.com, on which Tony guides you from the very beginnings of this move. Tony gives you some variations that are very much part of the basic freestyle movement vocabulary that I’ll probably not cover here.

End-overs are one of the most basic elements of freestyle, and in my opinion skateboarding in general, and are often overlooked. Until I started this project I honestly had no idea that people have trouble with this. I suppose because it is one of the first things I learned back in about 1975 or 76, it has just never occurred to me that everyone doesn’t do these. But I think skating began to be so vert and later street oriented that people just didn’t learn this.

So here’s my tip. It is intended as “additional commentary aimed at the old guys” to Tony’s more comprehensive instruction.

EndOvers from Bob Loftin on Vimeo.

I would also point out that when you can do endovers easily, stuff like this becomes easier as well, though it isn’t freestyle. Freestyle really should be, in addition to and end in itself, the fundamental building block of your skating.

360 Nose Rock from Bob Loftin on Vimeo.

Old Bastard Trick Tip #3: Walk the Dog

My talking seems to be increasing rather than decreasing, but I swear to remedy this. Part of the issue is that I am not just teaching the trick, but I’m also trying to talk to the old guys out there and address what I think are particular concerns and issues they might face. So that simply requires more talking. Next time I may wear a mask so y’all don’t get too sick of seeing my face.

So, Walk the Dog is one of the primary footwork tricks in freestyle. It’s important. Like the moves I’ve described in previous tips, it is a move that emphasizes the ability for the skater to move atop the board. It requires that your feet not be glued to the deck. You must be able to move them with some ease and eventually some grace. That’s the goal.

One thing I failed to mention in my excessive talking is the idea of not overpowering the kickturn in this. This move is all about subtle weight distribution. You may not have it at first. That’s OK. This trick will help you develop it. But when you are doing the kickturn part, try not to beat it to death. Just relax. Everything’s gonna be OK. A calm, peaceful, centered kickturn is what you want. So calm your mind, get all Zen, and let it flow slowly and smoothly.

Practice your Walk the Dog along with the previous tips here. Over, and over, and over. That’s how you get better. Mix them all together. Be creative!

I know with 100% certainty that you can do this!

Also, you can always get better! Looking at this video, I really need to work on my arm style. Man, it’s not the worst I’ve every seen, but it could be a lot better. I generally don’t like to copy anyone’s style, but when I see something in my own that I find ghastly, I try to adjust a bit.

Finally, for additional trick tips, and additional more detailed info on these, check out FreestyleTrickTips.com , by Tony Gale.

OBFTrickTip3 from Bob Loftin on Vimeo.

Old Bastard Freestyle Trick Tip #2: the Walk-Around

First, let me apologize for the excessive talking in this video. I was tired from my work day. But since probably 10 people will watch this video, and they are all friends, I figured it might be OK anyway, so here it is.

The Walk-Around (that’s what I call it, anyway) is simple footwork move that you can apply to a freestyle run, as footwork or as the entry into various tricks. It is quite versatile. With some speed and control during the initial wheelie carve, it can be quite stylish too. It’s a nice little move to have for nearly any skating situation. Next week when I go film some bank tricks for the upcoming NeverWas 2 video, I’m going to do this on – you guessed it – banks. My friend Tony Gale taught me a version of this going the other way, where you pivot on your heel rather than the ball of your foot, and it’s really cool. I’m going to start practicing it obsessively too.

So when you go out to skate, work this move in. Practice it with focus. Obsess on doing it as fluidly as you can. Try to make each one smoother than the last — your feet moving across the grip tape with ease. Really, it is fun to do! When you get this down, think about doing 2 in a row, than doing the previous tip (2 endovers into the Shove-It Thingie) all as one line. YOU CAN DO IT!

OBFTrickTip2 from Bob Loftin on Vimeo.

The Insane Challenge

As you go through these trick tips and tips on overall freestyle-ish-ness, I have a couple of challenges for you.

  1. Practice these every time you get on your board. At the end of any line you do, after any slappy, do one of these things. Make it a habit. That is how you learn.
  2. Shoot some video of yourself doing this stuff, put it on youtube or instagram, and share it on the Old Bastards Freestyle forum. Join the forum, on the Always Will message board, if you haven’t already. It is more fun to learn things when you share your progress and innovations with the like-minded.
  3. Ignore the ollie. Yes. Ignore it. So many skaters grew up doing ollies and ollie-based tricks constantly that they can’t do anything else. Even old guys do this, since guys who started skating in the mid to late 1980s are now OLD. Yet there are at least a million things you can do on flat without the ollie. So commit to practicing freestyle without the ollie, so it isn’t a crutch.

Once we have done 10 tips here, I’m thinking about doing a Cyber-Freestyle Challenge, where you will film a short run to share with everyone.

When you post something, use #TheInsaneFSChallenge. If you post on Instagram use @bibliosk8er as well. On Facebook, tag me.

So get on it!

 

 

Old Bastard Freestyle Tip #1: the Shove-It Thingie

This is a little move I use a lot in freestyle, but I tend to use it whenever I skate anthing. It’s a habit. One of the 7 habits of highly habitual people, or something like that. Anyway, its a useful move for freestyle, and also useful for changing which end of your board is forward without fumbling around with great spasticity.

OBFTrickTip1 from Bob Loftin on Vimeo.

OK, let’s do this.

I’m restarting this blog. I wasn’t going to do a trick tips site, but I had the domain name lying around and I really liked it, so what the hell.

This site is about freestyle skateboarding, but I’m going to aim it more at older skater who 1) may have done some freestyle a long time ago but gave it up when it started getting technical and people started standing on the tail of the board, etc., or 2) maybe have never really liked freestyle because they didn’t really see any flow in it, or whatever.

I think every skateboarder should be able to link some nice tricks together on flat. Other than just rolling and turning, what is more basic than that? It bums me out that so many skaters decline to even enter or participate in freestyle events because they “aren’t good at it.” That’s not what it’s about. It’s about getting out there and showing a few skills, having a good time, listening to some good music, and having your friends holler for you — just like all of skateboarding.

I’ll be doing some simple tricks here, most of which you’ll be able to do on any board. I won’t be doing any foot-on-the-ground tricks here like no-complies or bonelesses. Those are great tricks for street skating, but I want to concentrate here on flowing ON the board.

After maybe 10 of these tips, if you work on them, you should have enough going for you that you could participate in a freestyle contest and have something cool to do, because as you learn this stuff you will come up with new ideas. You will make it your own.

I think it would be good if you got yourself a freestyle board, but I’m not going to stress over it. I want you to learn some skills from freestyle that you can use in your everyday skate session. I’m sure I’ll be dropping some opinions here and there.

So there it is. Get on it.